Tag Archives: PCEP

PCEP Initiated LSP using OpenDayLight and Juniper vMX

Hi All

In this post, we will look at Open day light controller working with Juniper vMXs and how we can use the controller to get the BGP, BGP-LS and PCEP working. Once everything is up and running we will use the Controller to initiate the PCEP initiated MPLS LSPs between 2 VMXs.

Sounds interesting? Let’s see how we can achieve this.

Before I go further, if you want to check anything on PCEP and some of its concept, I did a post on Juniper Northstar Controller some time ago which you can check.

https://networkzblogger.com/2017/03/17/juniper-northstar-wan-sdn-controller/

Below is the topology we will be using where all Juniper VMXs are loaded in Virtual Control Plane mode and they have fxp0 interface in 192.168.71.x subnet. Open day light controller version is Nitrogen and we have booted it on CentOS 7.5 version.

There is Windows VM in same subnet also from where we will run the REST APIs calls to Open day light using POSTMAN App.

Topology Diagram
Topology Diagram

 

We will divide the post into 3 parts.

  • Configuring BGP/BGP-Link state between ODL and 192.168.71.24 VMX-3.
  • Configuring PCEP session between all VMXs and ODL
  • Initiate MPLS LSP from ODL using PCEP

I am assuming that you already know how to start an ODL controller. However if you don’t know let me know and I can help you.

So lets start with 1) Configuring BGP/BGP-Link state between ODL and 192.168.71.24 VMX-3.

If you already don’t know, Open day light versions in recent times doesn’t come auto-installed with all the features. You have to manually add them. You don’t need to download them individually. It’s just you need to activate them.

We will be configure the BGP and BGP-LS on VMX-3 first

Standard BGP config with IPv4 Unicast address family however for BGP-LS we have to enable a separate family traffic-engineering additionally.

root@VMX-3> show configuration protocols bgp
group opendaylight {
 type internal;
 description Controller;
 local-address 192.168.71.24;
 family inet {
 unicast;
 }
 family traffic-engineering {
 unicast;
 }
 peer-as 2856;
 neighbor 192.168.71.22;
}

On ODL side, First install the BGP and restconf feature on karaf console using command

feature:install odl-restconf odl-bgpcep-bgp

Then using REST API we will enable the BGP Router-ID with Link State family

POST URL : 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/config/openconfig-network-instance:network-instances/network-instance/global-bgp/openconfig-network-instance:protocols

POST Request_BGP Router ID
POST Request_BGP Router ID

Then Configure the peer 192.168.71.24 with specific BGP Parameters and families

POST URL: 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/config/openconfig-network-instance:network-instances/network-instance/global-bgp/openconfig-network-instance:protocols/protocol/openconfig-policy-types:BGP/bgp-test-odl/bgp/neighbors

POST Request_BGP Peer
POST Request_BGP Peer

We can check the status of BGP peering off course from VMX side but let’s see what comes up from ODL side

GET URL: 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/operational/bgp-rib:bgp-rib/rib/bgp-test-odl/peer/bgp:%2F%2F3.3.3.3

GET Request_BGP Peering
GET Request_BGP Peering

From VMX side:

root@VMX-3> show bgp neighbor
Peer: 192.168.71.22+27755 AS 2856 Local: 192.168.71.24+179 AS 2856
 Description: Controller
 Group: opendaylight Routing-Instance: master
 Forwarding routing-instance: master
 Type: Internal State: Established Flags: <Sync>
 Last State: OpenConfirm Last Event: RecvKeepAlive
 Last Error: None
 Options: <Preference LocalAddress LogUpDown AddressFamily PeerAS Refresh>
 Options: <VpnApplyExport DropPathAttributes>
 Address families configured: inet-unicast te-unicast
 Path-attributes dropped: 128
 Local Address: 192.168.71.24 Holdtime: 90 Preference: 170
 Number of flaps: 2
 Last flap event: RecvNotify
 Error: 'Cease' Sent: 0 Recv: 33
 Peer ID: 192.168.71.22 Local ID: 3.3.3.3 Active Holdtime: 90
 Keepalive Interval: 30 Group index: 0 Peer index: 0 SNMP index: 0
 I/O Session Thread: bgpio-0 State: Enabled
 BFD: disabled, down
 NLRI for restart configured on peer: inet-unicast te-unicast

 

BGP-LS configuration we did will be used to advertise the Traffic Engineering database to Controller. You can see the routes advertised using lsdist.0 table in juniper.

Snippet below:

root@VMX-3> show route table lsdist.0
lsdist.0: 11 destinations, 11 routes (11 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden)
+ = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:2.2.2.2 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:38
 Fictitious
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:3.3.3.3 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:43
 Fictitious
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:4.4.4.4 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:38
 Fictitious
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:4.4.4.4-192.168.71.26 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:31
 Fictitious
LINK { Local { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:2.2.2.2 }.{ IPv4:192.168.71.23 } Remote { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:4.4.4.4-192.168.71.26 }.{ } OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:31
 Fictitious
..
…
…

 

2) Now let’s configure the PCEP

On VMX (This will be repeated on all with change in local address)

root@VMX-3> show configuration protocols pcep
pce odl {
 local-address 192.168.71.24;
 destination-ipv4-address 192.168.71.22;
 destination-port 4189;
 pce-type active stateful;
 lsp-provisioning;
 p2mp-lsp-report-capability;
}

If you have any firewall, make sure to allow port 4189 between Controller and VMXs.

On ODL, we need to install odl-bgpcep-pcep feature

There is no other config to do. As soon as you install this feature, you should see PCEP status up.

Let’s see it from VMX-4

 

root@VMX-4> show path-computation-client status
Session Type            Provisioning Status
odl     Stateful Active On           Up

LSP Summary
 Total number of LSPs : 0
 Static LSPs : 0
 Externally controlled LSPs : 0
 Externally provisioned LSPs : 0/16000 (current/limit)
 Orphaned LSPs : 0

odl (main)
 Delegated : 0
 Externally provisioned : 0

From ODL side:

GET Request_PCEP Status
GET Request_PCEP Status

3)      PCEP Initiated LSP

Now, we will configure the LSP from VMX-3 to VMX-4 between their Loopback IPs.

POST URL: 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/operations/network-topology-pcep:add-lsp

You can see we haven’t given any ERO while provisioning the LSP. ODL has auto calculated the path and you can verify in VMX-3

PCEP LSP ADD with No Ero
PCEP LSP ADD with No Ero
root@VMX-3> show mpls lsp name test-pcep-2 extensive
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions

4.4.4.4
 From: 3.3.3.3, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: test-pcep-2
 ActivePath: (primary)
 LSPtype: Externally provisioned, Penultimate hop popping
 LSP Control Status: Externally controlled
 LoadBalance: Random
 Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
 LSP Self-ping Status : Enabled
 *Primary State: Up, Preference: 200
 Priorities: 0 0
 External Path CSPF Status: external
 SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
 Flap Count: 0
 MBB Count: 0
 Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt 20=Node-ID):
 192.168.71.26(Label=0)
 12 May 24 12:10:08.334 Self-ping ended successfully
 11 May 24 12:10:07.830 EXTCTRL LSP: Sent Path computation request and LSP status
 10 May 24 12:10:07.830 EXTCTRL_LSP: Computation request/lsp status contains: signalled bw 0 req BW 0 admin group(exclude 0 include any 0 include all 0) priority setup 0 hold 0
 9 May 24 12:10:07.829 Selected as active path
 8 May 24 12:10:07.828 EXTCTRL LSP: Sent Path computation request and LSP status
 7 May 24 12:10:07.828 EXTCTRL_LSP: Computation request/lsp status contains: signalled bw 0 req BW 0 admin group(exclude 0 include any 0 include all 0) priority setup 0 hold 0
 6 May 24 12:10:07.828 Up
 5 May 24 12:10:07.828 Self-ping started
 4 May 24 12:10:07.828 Self-ping enqueued
 3 May 24 12:10:07.828 Record Route: 192.168.71.26(Label=0)
 2 May 24 12:10:07.824 Originate Call
 1 May 24 12:10:07.824 EXTCTRL_LSP: Received setup parameters ::
 Created: Thu May 24 12:10:07 2018
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0

 

You can do various operations like Deleting LSP, Modifying LSP etc from REST API.

One thing which we can’t do at the moment using PCEP is configuring Point to Multipoint LSP as standard is still being drafted for this but I hope it will come out soon.

So that’s all for now, I hope you enjoyed it and let me know your feedback.

 

Regards

Mohit

 

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Juniper Northstar — WAN-SDN Controller

Biggest misconception I think currently with SDN is that in order to run SDN we need to have OpenvSwitch equivalent switch supporting Openflow protocol between Controller and Switch. Most software vendors are promoting their software under this category however Hardware vendors who have spent considerable money on building hardware platforms are not just selling switches supporting Openflow. They are using SDN to come up with other applications which are centrally controlling the network and influencing the network from single point but not using Openflow protocol.

Juniper has one of the similar product under WAN–SDN controller category named Northstar. I just happen to assess it recently for my Telco.

Northstar comes in two flavours, Controller and Planner. Controller enables granular visibility and control of IP/MPLS tunnels in large service provider and enterprise networks.

Northstar Planner is more of modelling tool which can help you in understanding the behaviour of new LSP addition, deletion, failure of node/link etc. on your network before you actually provision the network.

The NorthStar Controller relies on PCEP (Path Computation Element Protocol) to deploy a path between the PCC routers. The path setup itself is performed through RSVP-TE signaling, which is enabled in the network and allows labels to be assigned from an ingress router to the egress router. Signaling is triggered by ingress routers in the core of the network. The PCE client runs on the routers by using a version of the Junos that supports PCEP.

The NorthStar Controller provisions PCEP in all PE devices (PCCs) and uses PCEP to retrieve the current status of the existing tunnels (LSPs) that run in the network. By providing a view of the whole network state and bandwidth demand in your network, the NorthStar Controller is able to compute optimal paths and provide the attributes that the PCC uses to signal the LSP.

Example Topology

Northstar Controller Topology

If your network supports Point to Multipoint LSPs, then you need minimum of 15.1F6 version on your ingress PE to view P2MP LSPs on Northstar controller however Egress PE can be on any version. Northstar initiates an iBGP-Link state session between itself and Ingress PE and PCEP attributes are shared over this session.

Home Page:

Northstar Controller_Home Page

With Northstar, we can view all the LSPs in network from the point of view of Ingress PE supporting PCEP and from there on we can initiate an LSP and delegate LSP from PE to Controller to manage it.

Northstar lets you create single LSP, multiple LSPs at once and even diverse LSP by site or link which could be very useful in case of primary backup paths in order to protect against single source of failure.

Diverse LSP Provisioning

Northstar Controller_Provision Diverse LSPs

There are three types of TE LSPs used with PCEP

  • CLI-controlled LSPs—The LSPs that do not have the lsp-external-controller pccd statement configured are called CLI-controlled LSPs. Although these LSPs are under local router control, the PCC updates the connected PCE with information about the CLI-controlled LSPs during the initial LSP synchronization process.
  • PCE-controlled LSPs—The LSPs that have the lsp-external-controller pccd statement configured are called PCE-controlled LSPs or delegated LSPs. The PCC delegates the PCC-initiated LSPs to the main PCE for external path computation.
  • Externally-provisioned LSPs (or PCE-initiated LSPs)—The LSPs that have the lsp-provisioning statement configured are called PCE-initiated LSPs. A PCE-initiated LSP is dynamically created by an external PCE; as a result, there is no LSP configuration present on the PCC.

In its current version, Northstar is really impressive and only thing lacking at the moment in its in-ability to create P2MP LSPs which is must for broadcast applications in NG-MVPN environment and Juniper has plans to include this in their coming releases by end of 2017.

I am sure Service providers will surely think of using Northstar in their IP/MPLS Network where they are using Traffic Engineering LSPs in order to give them more flexibility and control over there traffic bandwidth demands.

Let me know your views on it and would you be interested to deploy this onto your network 🙂

R

Mohit Mittal