Category Archives: NFV

Connecting OpendayLight to Juniper Routers via Netconf

Hi All

In this blog, we will look at configuring Juniper routers via Opendaylight which in turn uses netconf/restconf for making the connection.

Before we can start doing the configuration we need to create a Netconf connector between Opendaylight and Juniper routers. Also before that let’s first see what NETCONF is 🙂

Network Configuration Protocol (NETCONF) provides a mechanism to install, manipulate and delete the configuration of network devices. It uses an Extensible Markup Language (XML) based data encoding for the configuration data as well as the protocol messages. The NETCONF protocol operations are realized as remote procedure calls (RPCs).

OpenDaylight uses YANG modules to access the device via NETCONF and we can do config as well. In this post we will see how to configure ODL for NETCONF connections. This is tried method so please do this as listed and I have seen others methods may not work properly.

Below topology we will be using in this blog.

  • Juniper MXs are running on 18.2R1 and 17.4R1
  • OpendayLight Release is Oxygen 0.8.2

 

ODL-Netconf-Juniper1) In First instance, you need to enable netconf on Juniper

write@Manchester> show configuration system services netconf
ssh {
    connection-limit 10;
    rate-limit 5;
}
rfc-compliant;
yang-compliant;

 

2) Download the 0.8.2 Oxygen Tar file from Opendaylight website and untar it.

Command “ tar –xvf karaf-0.8.2.tar.gz”

This will create a directory called karaf-0.8.2 in same directory structure.

[root@Opendaylight-2 sun]# ls -l | grep karaf-0.8.2
drwxr-xr-x. 13 root root      4096 Jul 26 15:42 karaf-0.8.2
-rw-rw-r--.  1 sun  sun  358590049 Jul 24 13:46 karaf-0.8.2.tar.gz

 

3) Now create a file called, 99-netconf-connector.xml and paste the following contents in it




  
    
      
        
        
          prefix:sal-netconf-connector
          controller-config
          
10.198.206.3
830 write write false true http://xml.juniper.net/xnm/1.1/xnm?module=configuration&revision=2018-01-01 prefix:netty-event-executor global-event-executor prefix:binding-broker-osgi-registry binding-osgi-broker prefix:dom-broker-osgi-registry dom-broker prefix:netconf-client-dispatcher global-netconf-dispatcher prefix:threadpool global-netconf-processing-executor prefix:scheduled-threadpool global-netconf-ssh-scheduled-executor urn:opendaylight:params:xml:ns:yang:controller:md:sal:connector:netconf?module=odl-sal-netconf-connector-cfg&revision=2015-08-03

You have to change the details for the values mentioned in Red above according to first device you are trying to add. Don’t change anything else. However if your Junos version is other than 18.2 then you need to check the revision number of yang modules and put the correct date for field in Green above.

Once done, save the file.

4)  Now start the opendaylight using command:

[root@Opendaylight-2 sun]# ./karaf-0.8.2/bin/karaf
Apache Karaf starting up. Press Enter to open the shell now...
100% [========================================================================]
Karaf started in 18s. Bundle stats: 388 active, 389 total
    ________                       ________                .__  .__       .__     __
    \_____  \ ______   ____   ____ \______ \ _____  ___.__.|  | |__| ____ |  |___/  |_
     /   |   \\____ \_/ __ \ /    \ |    |  \\__  \ >  ___/|   |  \|    `   \/ __ \\___  ||  |_|  / /_/  >   Y  \  |
    \_______  /   __/ \___  >___|  /_______  (____  / ____||____/__\___  /|___|  /__|
            \/|__|        \/     \/        \/     \/\/            /_____/      \/

Hit '' for a list of available commands
and '[cmd] --help' for help on a specific command.
Hit '' or type 'system:shutdown' or 'logout' to shutdown OpenDaylight.
opendaylight-user@root>

 

Install following packages, you don’t have to add any other at this moment of time:

feature:install odl-netconf-topology odl-restconf odl-netconf-connector-all

After installing, copy the file 99-netconf-connector.xml created above under directory karaf-0.8.2/etc/opendaylight/karaf/

cp 99-netconf-connector.xml karaf-0.8.2/etc/opendaylight/karaf/

 

5) After this, using POSTMAN or similar application, send a PUT request to following URL

PUT http://&lt;CONTROLLER-IP-ADDRESS:8181>/restconf/config/network-topology:network-topology/topology/topology-netconf/node/<node-name>

Same as before change the values in Red and Green accordingly for your case.

   node-name
   10.198.206.3
   830
   write
   write
   false
   0
   
    
	 http://xml.juniper.net/xnm/1.1/xnm?module=junos-common-types&revision=2018-01-01
	
	    
	 http://xml.juniper.net/xnm/1.1/xnm?module=module=junos-conf-root&revision=2018-01-01
	
	

 

6) After this restart the opendaylight

opendaylight-user@root>system:shutdown
Confirm: halt instance root (yes/no): yes
opendaylight-user@root>

[root@Opendaylight-2 sun]# ./karaf-0.8.2/bin/karaf
Apache Karaf starting up. Press Enter to open the shell now...
opendaylight-user@root>

At this point you should some messages like as mentioned in Karaf_Logs after adding the netconf-connector. Let it run..it may take 10-20 minutes from here which is basically ODL is pulling all the Juniper Yang modules in its cache/schema folder.

Once that is done you should see the below message in karaf log which you can see using log:tail from opendaylight shell prompt.

| INFO  | sing-executor-22 | NetconfDevice   | 304 - org.opendaylight.netconf.sal-netconf-connector - 1.7.2 | RemoteDevice{Manchester}: Netconf connector initialized successfully

Once you get the message, your node has been mounted which you can check using GET request at following URL

GET http:// <CONTROLLER-IP-ADDRESS:8181/restconf/operational/network-topology:network-topology/topology/topology-netconf/node/<Node-name>/yang-ext:mount/

GET-Mount

Now its ready to configure 🙂

Let’s configure a sample L3VPN using this

See the snapshot which is basically a PUT request with XML payload

Send-L3VPN-Request

Lets’s verify

write@Manchester> show configuration routing-instances odl-test
instance-type vrf;
interface xe-0/2/0.4000;
route-distinguisher 10.198.206.41:4000;
vrf-target target:2856:4000;
vrf-table-label;
routing-options {
    multipath;
    protect core;
}
protocols {
    bgp {
        group ebgp {
            type external;
            peer-as 65101;
            as-override;
            neighbor 7.7.7.7 {
                authentication-key "$9$CuyoAORhclMLNylJDkP3nylKvWx"; ## SECRET-DATA
                bfd-liveness-detection {
                    minimum-interval 100;
                    multiplier 3;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

 

Here you go.. its working 🙂

That’s all for today.. I will do a separate blog for other service configurations via ODL. Let me know if you have any questions.

 

Bbye

Mohit

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PCEP Initiated LSP using OpenDayLight and Juniper vMX

Hi All

In this post, we will look at Open day light controller working with Juniper vMXs and how we can use the controller to get the BGP, BGP-LS and PCEP working. Once everything is up and running we will use the Controller to initiate the PCEP initiated MPLS LSPs between 2 VMXs.

Sounds interesting? Let’s see how we can achieve this.

Before I go further, if you want to check anything on PCEP and some of its concept, I did a post on Juniper Northstar Controller some time ago which you can check.

https://networkzblogger.com/2017/03/17/juniper-northstar-wan-sdn-controller/

Below is the topology we will be using where all Juniper VMXs are loaded in Virtual Control Plane mode and they have fxp0 interface in 192.168.71.x subnet. Open day light controller version is Nitrogen and we have booted it on CentOS 7.5 version.

There is Windows VM in same subnet also from where we will run the REST APIs calls to Open day light using POSTMAN App.

Topology Diagram
Topology Diagram

 

We will divide the post into 3 parts.

  • Configuring BGP/BGP-Link state between ODL and 192.168.71.24 VMX-3.
  • Configuring PCEP session between all VMXs and ODL
  • Initiate MPLS LSP from ODL using PCEP

I am assuming that you already know how to start an ODL controller. However if you don’t know let me know and I can help you.

So lets start with 1) Configuring BGP/BGP-Link state between ODL and 192.168.71.24 VMX-3.

If you already don’t know, Open day light versions in recent times doesn’t come auto-installed with all the features. You have to manually add them. You don’t need to download them individually. It’s just you need to activate them.

We will be configure the BGP and BGP-LS on VMX-3 first

Standard BGP config with IPv4 Unicast address family however for BGP-LS we have to enable a separate family traffic-engineering additionally.

root@VMX-3> show configuration protocols bgp
group opendaylight {
 type internal;
 description Controller;
 local-address 192.168.71.24;
 family inet {
 unicast;
 }
 family traffic-engineering {
 unicast;
 }
 peer-as 2856;
 neighbor 192.168.71.22;
}

On ODL side, First install the BGP and restconf feature on karaf console using command

feature:install odl-restconf odl-bgpcep-bgp

Then using REST API we will enable the BGP Router-ID with Link State family

POST URL : 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/config/openconfig-network-instance:network-instances/network-instance/global-bgp/openconfig-network-instance:protocols

POST Request_BGP Router ID
POST Request_BGP Router ID

Then Configure the peer 192.168.71.24 with specific BGP Parameters and families

POST URL: 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/config/openconfig-network-instance:network-instances/network-instance/global-bgp/openconfig-network-instance:protocols/protocol/openconfig-policy-types:BGP/bgp-test-odl/bgp/neighbors

POST Request_BGP Peer
POST Request_BGP Peer

We can check the status of BGP peering off course from VMX side but let’s see what comes up from ODL side

GET URL: 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/operational/bgp-rib:bgp-rib/rib/bgp-test-odl/peer/bgp:%2F%2F3.3.3.3

GET Request_BGP Peering
GET Request_BGP Peering

From VMX side:

root@VMX-3> show bgp neighbor
Peer: 192.168.71.22+27755 AS 2856 Local: 192.168.71.24+179 AS 2856
 Description: Controller
 Group: opendaylight Routing-Instance: master
 Forwarding routing-instance: master
 Type: Internal State: Established Flags: <Sync>
 Last State: OpenConfirm Last Event: RecvKeepAlive
 Last Error: None
 Options: <Preference LocalAddress LogUpDown AddressFamily PeerAS Refresh>
 Options: <VpnApplyExport DropPathAttributes>
 Address families configured: inet-unicast te-unicast
 Path-attributes dropped: 128
 Local Address: 192.168.71.24 Holdtime: 90 Preference: 170
 Number of flaps: 2
 Last flap event: RecvNotify
 Error: 'Cease' Sent: 0 Recv: 33
 Peer ID: 192.168.71.22 Local ID: 3.3.3.3 Active Holdtime: 90
 Keepalive Interval: 30 Group index: 0 Peer index: 0 SNMP index: 0
 I/O Session Thread: bgpio-0 State: Enabled
 BFD: disabled, down
 NLRI for restart configured on peer: inet-unicast te-unicast

 

BGP-LS configuration we did will be used to advertise the Traffic Engineering database to Controller. You can see the routes advertised using lsdist.0 table in juniper.

Snippet below:

root@VMX-3> show route table lsdist.0
lsdist.0: 11 destinations, 11 routes (11 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden)
+ = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:2.2.2.2 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:38
 Fictitious
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:3.3.3.3 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:43
 Fictitious
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:4.4.4.4 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:38
 Fictitious
NODE { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:4.4.4.4-192.168.71.26 OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:31
 Fictitious
LINK { Local { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:2.2.2.2 }.{ IPv4:192.168.71.23 } Remote { AS:2856 Area:0.0.0.0 IPv4:4.4.4.4-192.168.71.26 }.{ } OSPF:0 }/1152
 *[OSPF/10] 02:02:31
 Fictitious
..
…
…

 

2) Now let’s configure the PCEP

On VMX (This will be repeated on all with change in local address)

root@VMX-3> show configuration protocols pcep
pce odl {
 local-address 192.168.71.24;
 destination-ipv4-address 192.168.71.22;
 destination-port 4189;
 pce-type active stateful;
 lsp-provisioning;
 p2mp-lsp-report-capability;
}

If you have any firewall, make sure to allow port 4189 between Controller and VMXs.

On ODL, we need to install odl-bgpcep-pcep feature

There is no other config to do. As soon as you install this feature, you should see PCEP status up.

Let’s see it from VMX-4

 

root@VMX-4> show path-computation-client status
Session Type            Provisioning Status
odl     Stateful Active On           Up

LSP Summary
 Total number of LSPs : 0
 Static LSPs : 0
 Externally controlled LSPs : 0
 Externally provisioned LSPs : 0/16000 (current/limit)
 Orphaned LSPs : 0

odl (main)
 Delegated : 0
 Externally provisioned : 0

From ODL side:

GET Request_PCEP Status
GET Request_PCEP Status

3)      PCEP Initiated LSP

Now, we will configure the LSP from VMX-3 to VMX-4 between their Loopback IPs.

POST URL: 192.168.71.22:8181/restconf/operations/network-topology-pcep:add-lsp

You can see we haven’t given any ERO while provisioning the LSP. ODL has auto calculated the path and you can verify in VMX-3

PCEP LSP ADD with No Ero
PCEP LSP ADD with No Ero
root@VMX-3> show mpls lsp name test-pcep-2 extensive
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions

4.4.4.4
 From: 3.3.3.3, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: test-pcep-2
 ActivePath: (primary)
 LSPtype: Externally provisioned, Penultimate hop popping
 LSP Control Status: Externally controlled
 LoadBalance: Random
 Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
 LSP Self-ping Status : Enabled
 *Primary State: Up, Preference: 200
 Priorities: 0 0
 External Path CSPF Status: external
 SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
 Flap Count: 0
 MBB Count: 0
 Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt 20=Node-ID):
 192.168.71.26(Label=0)
 12 May 24 12:10:08.334 Self-ping ended successfully
 11 May 24 12:10:07.830 EXTCTRL LSP: Sent Path computation request and LSP status
 10 May 24 12:10:07.830 EXTCTRL_LSP: Computation request/lsp status contains: signalled bw 0 req BW 0 admin group(exclude 0 include any 0 include all 0) priority setup 0 hold 0
 9 May 24 12:10:07.829 Selected as active path
 8 May 24 12:10:07.828 EXTCTRL LSP: Sent Path computation request and LSP status
 7 May 24 12:10:07.828 EXTCTRL_LSP: Computation request/lsp status contains: signalled bw 0 req BW 0 admin group(exclude 0 include any 0 include all 0) priority setup 0 hold 0
 6 May 24 12:10:07.828 Up
 5 May 24 12:10:07.828 Self-ping started
 4 May 24 12:10:07.828 Self-ping enqueued
 3 May 24 12:10:07.828 Record Route: 192.168.71.26(Label=0)
 2 May 24 12:10:07.824 Originate Call
 1 May 24 12:10:07.824 EXTCTRL_LSP: Received setup parameters ::
 Created: Thu May 24 12:10:07 2018
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0

 

You can do various operations like Deleting LSP, Modifying LSP etc from REST API.

One thing which we can’t do at the moment using PCEP is configuring Point to Multipoint LSP as standard is still being drafted for this but I hope it will come out soon.

So that’s all for now, I hope you enjoyed it and let me know your feedback.

 

Regards

Mohit

 

JunOS Automation using PyEZ and Northstar REST APIs

Hi All, in this session lets discuss some Automation.

During past few days, I was looking at some REST APIs for Juniper Northstar Controller. Now Northstar is good for LSP creation/deletion/modification but it cant configure the service E2E. Offcourse that tool is not meant to do all this but Juniper has recently released one beta version of it which can bind your LSP to some service which is excellent step forward. We will see that in a moment. Juniper is leveraging Jinja templates in NS to achieve this binding.

However as I said still service creation is not E2E and for that I thought of adding one more layer of automation and for this I have used Juniper own PyEZ framework which is basically Juniper Python library for automating tasks. Brilliant lets see how this work.

Juniper PyEZ is a framework which is easily grasped by Network engineers and you don’t need to be programmer to fully understand it.

https://www.juniper.net/documentation/en_US/junos-pyez/topics/concept/junos-pyez-overview.html

REST (REpresentational State Transfer) is a set of useful conventions and principals about transfer of information over the World Wide Web.

Many Web services are now using the principals of REST in their design.

When you type a URL into your browser, like http://example.net, your browser software creates an HTTP header that identifies:

  • a desired action: GET (“get me this resource”).
  • a target machine (www.domain-name.com).

The NorthStar RESTful APIs are designed to enable access over HTTP to most of the same data and analytics that are available to you from both the NorthStar GUI and the NorthStar CLI.

https://www.juniper.net/documentation/en_US/northstar3.1.0/information-products/api-ref/api-ref.html

Below is the pictorial representation of what we will be doing. I have used a Windows server on which we will write a script which will talk to Northstar using REST APIs and other components of Juniper Pes using PyEZ.

L2VPN CCC
Automation Model

 

Our Script will be written in Python and you can write the variables value in excel and pass it to the script.

Our excel format:

L2VPN_CCC_Data

import httplib
import json
import time
import re
import sys
import pandas as pd
from jnpr.junos import Device
from jnpr.junos.utils.config import Config
from pprint import pprint

df = pd.read_excel("L2VPN_CCC_Data.xlsx","Sheet1")

PE1 = str((df['PE1'].values.tolist())[0])
PE2 = str((df['PE2'].values.tolist())[0])
Interface_PE1 = str((df['Interface_PE1'].values.tolist())[0])
Unit_PE1 = str((df['Unit_PE1'].values.tolist())[0])
Vlan_PE1 = str((df['Vlan_PE1'].values.tolist())[0])
Interface_PE2 = str((df['Interface_PE2'].values.tolist())[0])
Unit_PE2 = str((df['Unit_PE2'].values.tolist())[0])
Vlan_PE2 = str((df['Vlan_PE2'].values.tolist())[0])
LSP_Name_PE1 = str((df['LSP_Name_PE1'].values.tolist())[0])
LSP_Name_PE2 = str((df['LSP_Name_PE2'].values.tolist())[0])
VPN_CCC_PE1 = str((df['VPN_CCC_PE1'].values.tolist())[0])
VPN_CCC_PE2 = str((df['VPN_CCC_PE2'].values.tolist())[0])

dev1 = Device(host=''+PE1+'', user='demo', password='password', port='22')
dev1.open()
dev1.timeout = 300

with Config(dev1, mode='private') as cu: 
cu.load('set interfaces '+Interface_PE1+' unit '+Unit_PE1+' description L2VPN-CCC encapsulation vlan-ccc vlan-id '+Vlan_PE1+' family ccc', format='set')
cu.pdiff() #Printing the difference in the configuration after the load
cu.commit()

dev1.close()
dev2 = Device(host=''+PE2+'', user='demo', password='password', port='22')
dev2.open()
dev2.timeout = 300

with Config(dev2, mode='private') as cu: 
cu.load('set interfaces '+Interface_PE2+' unit '+Unit_PE2+' description L2VPN-CCC encapsulation vlan-ccc vlan-id '+Vlan_PE2+' family ccc', format='set')
cu.pdiff() #Printing the difference in the configuration after the load#
cu.commit() #commit#

dev2.close()
conn = httplib.HTTPConnection('10.198.123.180:8091')
Bandwidth = raw_input('Please enter LSP Bandwidth on '+PE1+' (e.g 100k): ')
Setup_Pri = raw_input('Please enter Set up Priority: ')
Hold_Pri = raw_input('Please enter Hold Priority: ')
payload = str('{\r\n\"name\": \"'+LSP_Name_PE1+'\",\r\n\"creationConfigurationMethod\": \"NETCONF\",\r\n\"provisioningType\": \"RSVP\",\r\n  \"pathType\": \"primary\",\r\n  \"from\": {\r\n\"topoObjectType\": \"ipv4\",\r\n\"address\": \"'+PE1+'\"\r\n },\r\n  \"to\": {\r\n\"topoObjectType\": \"ipv4\",\r\n\"address\": \"'+PE2+'\"\r\n},\r\n\"plannedProperties\": {\r\n\"bandwidth\": \"'+Bandwidth+'\",\r\n\"setupPriority\": '+Setup_Pri+',\r\n\"holdingPriority\": '+Hold_Pri+',\r\n\"userProperties\": {\r\n \"ccc-vpn-name\": \"'+VPN_CCC_PE1+'\",\r\n \"ccc-interface\": \"'+Interface_PE1+'.'+Unit_PE1+'\",\r\n\"transmit-lsp\": \"'+LSP_Name_PE1+'\",\r\n\"receive-lsp\": \"'+LSP_Name_PE2+'\"\r\n    }\r\n  }\r\n}\r\n')
headers = {
 'content-type': "application/json",
'cache-control': "no-cache",
 }

conn.request ("POST", "/NorthStar/API/v2/tenant/1/topology/1/te-lsps", payload, headers
res = conn.getresponse()
data = res.read()
print 'Please wait while we get the status of LSP you created :)'
for i in xrange(25,0,-1):
 time.sleep(1)
 sys.stdout.write(str(i)+' ') 
 sys.stdout.flush()
 conn.request("GET", str('/NorthStar/API/v2/tenant/1/topology/1/te-lsps/search?name=' + LSP_Name_PE1), headers=headers
 res = conn.getresponse()
 data = res.read()

LSP_Status = re.search('operationalStatus":(.*?),', data).group(1)
if LSP_Status == '"Active"':
  print ('\nSuccess: LSP "'+LSP_Name_PE1+'" is Created and Active')
elif LSP_Status == "Down":
   print ('\nFailed: LSP "'+LSP_Name_PE1+'" is created however Down')
else:
  print ('\nFailed: LSP "'+LSP_Name_PE1+'" is not created and is in Unknown State on Northstar')

time.sleep(10)

conn = httplib.HTTPConnection('10.198.123.180:8091')
Bandwidth = raw_input('Please enter LSP Bandwidth on '+PE2+' (e.g 100k): ')
Setup_Pri = raw_input('Please enter Set up Priority: ')
Hold_Pri = raw_input('Please enter Hold Priority: ')

payload = str('{\r\n\"name\": \"'+LSP_Name_PE2+'\",\r\n\"creationConfigurationMethod\": \"NETCONF\",\r\n\"provisioningType\": \"RSVP\",\r\n  \"pathType\": \"primary\",\r\n  \"from\": {\r\n\"topoObjectType\": \"ipv4\",\r\n\"address\": \"'+PE2+'\"\r\n },\r\n  \"to\": {\r\n\"topoObjectType\": \"ipv4\",\r\n\"address\": \"'+PE1+'\"\r\n},\r\n\"plannedProperties\": {\r\n\"bandwidth\": \"'+Bandwidth+'\",\r\n\"setupPriority\": '+Setup_Pri+',\r\n\"holdingPriority\": '+Hold_Pri+',\r\n\"userProperties\": {\r\n \"ccc-vpn-name\": \"'+VPN_CCC_PE2+'\",\r\n \"ccc-interface\":\"'+Interface_PE2+'.'+Unit_PE2+'\",\r\n\"transmit-lsp\": \"'+LSP_Name_PE2+'\",\r\n\"receive-lsp\": \"'+LSP_Name_PE1+'\"\r\n    }\r\n  }\r\n}\r\n')
headers = {
 'content-type': "application/json",
 'cache-control': "no-cache",
   }

conn.request ("POST", "/NorthStar/API/v2/tenant/1/topology/1/te-lsps", payload, headers)
res = conn.getresponse()
data = res.read()
print 'Please wait while we get the status of LSP you created :)'
for i in xrange(25,0,-1):
   time.sleep(1)
   sys.stdout.write(str(i)+' ')
   sys.stdout.flush()

conn.request("GET", str('/NorthStar/API/v2/tenant/1/topology/1/te-lsps/search?name=' + LSP_Name_PE2), headers=headers)
res = conn.getresponse()
data = res.read()
LSP_Status = re.search('operationalStatus":(.*?),', data).group(1)
if LSP_Status == '"Active"':
    print ('\nSuccess: LSP "'+LSP_Name_PE2+'" is Created and Active')
elif LSP_Status == "Down":
    print ('\nFailed: LSP "'+LSP_Name_PE2+'" is created however Down')
else:
    print ('\nFailed: LSP "'+LSP_Name_PE2+'" is not created and is in Unknown State on Northstar')

time.sleep(5)

dev1.open()
dev2.open()

print (dev1.cli('show connections remote-interface-switch '+VPN_CCC_PE1+'', warning=False))

print (dev2.cli('show connections remote-interface-switch '+VPN_CCC_PE2+'', warning=False))

dev1.close()
dev2.close()

In this script we are making reading the values from the excel and using it as variables in or script.

After that using PyEZ, making a SSH connection to PE1 and PE2 and configuring the layer 2 sub-interfaces with vpn-ccc encapsulations. Once that is done, connection to Northstar server 10.198.123.180 using httplib libraris/modules is made and waiting for Northstar to configure the LSP. At this stage Northstar is also binding that LSPs in connections using Jinja template. Once Northstar has created the LSPs we are using regular expression to get the LSP Index from Northstar and checking whether LSP creating in Success or failed.

At last we are printing the show command output to find out if everything is up and running 🙂

Lets see by running the script

C:\Program Files (x86)\Python\Northstar_Scripts\Working\Juniper\L2VPN_CCC>python
 E2E_L2VPN_CCC_Script.py
[edit interfaces xe-2/0/0]
+ unit 601 {
+ description L2VPN-CCC;
+ encapsulation vlan-ccc;
+ vlan-id 601;
+ family ccc;
+ }
[edit interfaces xe-2/0/0]
+ unit 601 {
+ description L2VPN-CCC;
+ encapsulation vlan-ccc;
+ vlan-id 601;
+ family ccc;
+ }
Please enter LSP Bandwidth on 10.198.123.100 (e.g 100k): 70m
Please enter Set up Priority: 5
Please enter Hold Priority: 0
Please wait while we get the status of LSP you created :)
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Success: LSP "l2vpn-ccc-1" is created and is Active
Please enter LSP Bandwidth on 10.198.123.205 (e.g 100k): 70m
Please enter Set up Priority: 5
Please enter Hold Priority: 0
Please wait while we get the status of LSP you created :)
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Success: LSP "l2vpn-ccc-2" is created and is Active
CCC and TCC connections [Link Monitoring On]
Legend for status (St): Legend for connection types:
 UN -- uninitialized if-sw: interface switching
 NP -- not present rmt-if: remote interface switching
 WE -- wrong encapsulation lsp-sw: LSP switching
 DS -- disabled tx-p2mp-sw: transmit P2MP switching
 Dn -- down rx-p2mp-sw: receive P2MP switching
 -> -- only outbound conn is up Legend for circuit types:
 <- -- only inbound conn is up intf -- interface
 Up -- operational oif -- outgoing interface
 RmtDn -- remote CCC down tlsp -- transmit LSP
 Restart -- restarting rlsp -- receive LSP
Connection/Circuit Type St Time last up # Up tran
s
l2vpn-ccc rmt-if Up Nov 25 12:52:10
1
 xe-2/0/0.601 intf Up
 l2vpn-ccc-1 tlsp Up
 l2vpn-ccc-2 rlsp Up

CCC and TCC connections [Link Monitoring On]
Legend for status (St): Legend for connection types:
 UN -- uninitialized if-sw: interface switching
 NP -- not present rmt-if: remote interface switching
 WE -- wrong encapsulation lsp-sw: LSP switching
 DS -- disabled tx-p2mp-sw: transmit P2MP switching
 Dn -- down rx-p2mp-sw: receive P2MP switching
 -> -- only outbound conn is up Legend for circuit types:
 <- -- only inbound conn is up intf -- interface
 Up -- operational oif -- outgoing interface
 RmtDn -- remote CCC down tlsp -- transmit LSP
 Restart -- restarting rlsp -- receive LSP

Connection/Circuit Type St Time last up # Up tran
s
l2vpn-ccc rmt-if Up Nov 25 12:52:11
1
 xe-2/0/0.601 intf Up
 l2vpn-ccc-2 tlsp Up
 l2vpn-ccc-1 rlsp Up

C:\Program Files (x86)\Python\Northstar_Scripts\Working\Juniper\L2VPN_CCC>

 

So that’s all for today.. You can see the possibility of using this framework in so many tasks in your daily networking journey. I hope you like this blog and will try to use it in your network 🙂

Regards

Mohit

Juniper Northstar SDN Controller – Part 2

Following on my earlier blog on Northstar here: https://networkzblogger.com/2017/03/17/juniper-northstar-wan-sdn-controller, recently I got chance to work on next release of it which has among other things is ability to initiate P2MP (Point to Multipoint) LSPs. P2MPs are big use case in Media and Broadcast network and ability to create them via controller would be too helpful. However there is a catch. As discussed in my earlier blog, the NorthStar (NS) Controller relies on PCEP (Path Computation Element Protocol) to deploy a path between the PCC router and PCE (Controller). Currently P2MPs are not initiated by PCEP or its standard is not ratified. So Juniper have come up with another way of configuring it and that’s via Netconf. NETCONF provides mechanisms to install, manipulate, and delete the configuration of network devices. Its operations are realized on top of a simple Remote Procedure Call (RPC) layer. The protocol messages are exchanged on top of a secure transport protocol like SSH etc.

In this blog, instead of looking at PCEP based LSPs from Northstar we will explore netconf functionality and what other features have been introduced in new ns version.

Below is our current model which is built using TED (Traffic Engineering Database) by Northstar and if you look closely there are 2 devices which have PCEP session up because they have correct Junos code on it (15.1F6 and later) however all others are having netconf session Up even if they are on Junos 10, 12, 14 etc. which is cool thing. So as long as you have netconf stanza added in Junos config and have ssh connectivity that is all Northstar need to connect to devices.

Pic-1

Lets start by configuring a P2MP LSP via Northstar

You can see 2 options here for provisioning method. One is PCEP and other is Netconf.

Pic-2

We will choose Netconf and fill other bits.

Pic-3

We have kept Path as dynamic however we can choose required path to TE it more. Under Advanced Tab, you will see P2MP Name field, in which we have added the P2MP name.

Pic-4

All others field you can pretty much keep default.

Once you submit it, Northstar will open a netconf session on port 830 towards headend router which is M320 in our case and push and commit the config to it.

Pic-5

You can see above LSP has become Active and its showing the path as well which this LSP is taking. Now one of the biggest difference between PCEP created LSP and one created from Netconf is that Netconf LSPs will be part of startup-config in Junos as the configs are committing to it so it can be slow process getting your LSP up based upon commit time. Also all Netconf created LSPs are basically shown as PCC Controlled. However PCEP just sent LSP state to network to build E2E path rather than config. PCEP LSP config still resides in NS database and LSPs are created within seconds and are PCE Initiated.

M320> show configuration protocols mpls label-switched-path demo-0610
from 10.198.123.203;
to 10.198.123.103;
p2mp demo-0610-p2p;
primary demo-0610.p0 {
 apply-groups demo-0610-p2p;
}

M320> show configuration groups demo-0610-p2p
protocols {
 mpls {
 label-switched-path <*> {
 primary <*> {
 bandwidth 10m;
 priority 7 7;
 }
 }
 }
}

Ok so that’s for P2MP LSPs which is clean. In 3.1.0 one of the issue we found was related to commit process. Suppose you have 10 LSPs to be created from one source to destination. With Netconf, NS will commit 10 times individually for those LSPs which can be time consuming on some of the MX104s, MX80s with less CPU power. Juniper is looking to change this and putting the commit in batches to decrease the overall time and commit process which would be excellent J

So we have seen now how P2MP LSPs are created via Netconf however we haven’t seen how Netconf parameters are configured on NS as with netconf you can see the analytics data as well which is populated by Telemetry. We will see Telemetry in some other blog.

Under Administration -> Device Profiles we have to set the parameters for individual device.

Pic-6

We enable Netconf and add login details and password. You can test the connectivity as well from NS before actually trying to provision the network.

Pic-7

Apart from P2MP, another thing which has been introduced is while provisioning the LSP you can select which routing method you need to choose. There are many methods starting from default to routebyPCC, etc. default means that NS will calculate the path and routebyPCC means routers will calculate the path and NS won’t be having any say in it.

Pic-8

Another new feature which has been introduced in release 3.1.0 is setting the current path as explicit.

So above P2MP LSP I created was just dynamic however if we want to explicitly make this path as Strict so that LSP doesn’t change path based upon the network conditions we can configure it as below.

Pic-9

If we see the CLI now, NS has filled strict path in it.

M320> show configuration protocols mpls path demo-0610.p0
10.177.177.5 strict;
10.0.0.245 strict;

Ok that’s all for this blog. I hope you like it and let me know your views if you are looking at using NS for your network and if you are already, what are your use cases J

 

R

Mohit Mittal

 

Juniper Northstar — WAN-SDN Controller

Biggest misconception I think currently with SDN is that in order to run SDN we need to have OpenvSwitch equivalent switch supporting Openflow protocol between Controller and Switch. Most software vendors are promoting their software under this category however Hardware vendors who have spent considerable money on building hardware platforms are not just selling switches supporting Openflow. They are using SDN to come up with other applications which are centrally controlling the network and influencing the network from single point but not using Openflow protocol.

Juniper has one of the similar product under WAN–SDN controller category named Northstar. I just happen to assess it recently for my Telco.

Northstar comes in two flavours, Controller and Planner. Controller enables granular visibility and control of IP/MPLS tunnels in large service provider and enterprise networks.

Northstar Planner is more of modelling tool which can help you in understanding the behaviour of new LSP addition, deletion, failure of node/link etc. on your network before you actually provision the network.

The NorthStar Controller relies on PCEP (Path Computation Element Protocol) to deploy a path between the PCC routers. The path setup itself is performed through RSVP-TE signaling, which is enabled in the network and allows labels to be assigned from an ingress router to the egress router. Signaling is triggered by ingress routers in the core of the network. The PCE client runs on the routers by using a version of the Junos that supports PCEP.

The NorthStar Controller provisions PCEP in all PE devices (PCCs) and uses PCEP to retrieve the current status of the existing tunnels (LSPs) that run in the network. By providing a view of the whole network state and bandwidth demand in your network, the NorthStar Controller is able to compute optimal paths and provide the attributes that the PCC uses to signal the LSP.

Example Topology

Northstar Controller Topology

If your network supports Point to Multipoint LSPs, then you need minimum of 15.1F6 version on your ingress PE to view P2MP LSPs on Northstar controller however Egress PE can be on any version. Northstar initiates an iBGP-Link state session between itself and Ingress PE and PCEP attributes are shared over this session.

Home Page:

Northstar Controller_Home Page

With Northstar, we can view all the LSPs in network from the point of view of Ingress PE supporting PCEP and from there on we can initiate an LSP and delegate LSP from PE to Controller to manage it.

Northstar lets you create single LSP, multiple LSPs at once and even diverse LSP by site or link which could be very useful in case of primary backup paths in order to protect against single source of failure.

Diverse LSP Provisioning

Northstar Controller_Provision Diverse LSPs

There are three types of TE LSPs used with PCEP

  • CLI-controlled LSPs—The LSPs that do not have the lsp-external-controller pccd statement configured are called CLI-controlled LSPs. Although these LSPs are under local router control, the PCC updates the connected PCE with information about the CLI-controlled LSPs during the initial LSP synchronization process.
  • PCE-controlled LSPs—The LSPs that have the lsp-external-controller pccd statement configured are called PCE-controlled LSPs or delegated LSPs. The PCC delegates the PCC-initiated LSPs to the main PCE for external path computation.
  • Externally-provisioned LSPs (or PCE-initiated LSPs)—The LSPs that have the lsp-provisioning statement configured are called PCE-initiated LSPs. A PCE-initiated LSP is dynamically created by an external PCE; as a result, there is no LSP configuration present on the PCC.

In its current version, Northstar is really impressive and only thing lacking at the moment in its in-ability to create P2MP LSPs which is must for broadcast applications in NG-MVPN environment and Juniper has plans to include this in their coming releases by end of 2017.

I am sure Service providers will surely think of using Northstar in their IP/MPLS Network where they are using Traffic Engineering LSPs in order to give them more flexibility and control over there traffic bandwidth demands.

Let me know your views on it and would you be interested to deploy this onto your network 🙂

R

Mohit Mittal

 

 

 

 

Software Defined Networking – SDN

SDN as I mentioned in previous discussion is to separate out the Control Plane from Router or any network component and provide the centralized place to control the whole Network Topology. You know in any Network device, we have Control Plane, Mgmt Plane and Data plane doing their own set of work (e.g in Cisco 6509 you have Line cards acting as Dataplane, Route Processor as Control Plane and Mgmt plane is how you are accessing the device via SSH/Telnet etc) and in SDN you are separating out the Control plane from these Network devices to make them only works as pure Forwarding devices.

All the routing protocols and control data is taken care by Centralized location which in SDN terminology is called “SDN Controller”. SDN Controller talks to Infrastructure (Forwarding Network devices) via Southbound APIs and Controller can talk to Applications above it via Northbound APIs as you can see in image below.

IMG_4011

Source :-www.opennetworking.org

So you will build Applications like any software on your desktop which talks to Controller and Controller then talks to Forwarding devices via Southbound APIs. In this way you will have centralized way of communicating with Forwarding Network devices and Network devices only work will be to send the traffic from one source to destination as fast as possible without worrying about Control protocols like OSPF, BGP, ISIS etc.

Most common Southbound interface is Openflow which is Open source protocol developed by ONF (Open Networking Foundation). Network devices can be specialized hardware switches from companies like Cisco, Brocade, Juniper etc. or they can be Virtual devices (VMs) for which they are called Open vSwitch. Only requirement for Hardware switches to use with Openflow is that those switches should be able to support Openflow. There are several products in market from various hardware vendors which supports Openflow i.e. Juniper EX9200 Ethernet Switches, MX960 Router, Big Switch Networks – Big Virtual Switch and many many more.

Openflow is not the only protocol which you use for Controller to talk to Network devices; instead other protocols like SNMP, NetConfig, OVSDB are also there but most common protocol in use is Openflow only and all the companies who are currently building the Openflow support are members of ONF as I explained above.

There are various pre-built VM packages you can get today from Internet which you can run from VMware or Virtual Box and they will open the Interface from where you can create your own topologies to work with. Topologies like 1 Virtual Controller, 3 OpenvSwitches with 3 Hosts. Those VM Images will come pre-built with SDN Controllers, Open vSwitch with support for Openflow, Mininet to create and run example topologies, Wireshark, JDK 1.8, Eclipse Luna etc etc.

In next blogs, i will try to give more from hands on perspective from one of these VM Packages and will also talk about how some projects are currently using this.

Please let me know if you have any queries.

Mohit Mittal